Annotated Bibliography: Improving Urban Transportation in Canada through Planning

Annotated Bibliography: Improving Urban Transportation in Canada through Planning

Statement of Research Topic

Most cities in Canada such as Toronto, Vancouver, and Ontario use vehicles and trains as the primary transit. The overdependence on rail and road is due to lack of complimentary avenues that can promote alternative transport systems such as cycling tracks. Besides, the public transport system has failed to improve the transport interchange facilities in urban areas. Consequently, Canadians using public transport in most cities experience frustration frequently. The challenges of failures and overdependence on train and vehicle transportation can be addressed through proper planning the transportation networks in the Canadian urban areas. Previous research has tried to highlight some of the urban planning strategies used to improve transport. The current study seeks to build on previous literature by identifying the strategies that can be incorporated in urban planning to improve transportation and improve the experience of locals and visitors to such area. The following section will summarize and analyse the relevant articles that will be incorporated into the study.

Annotated Bibliography

Manaugh, Kevin, Madhav G. Badami, and Ahmed M. El-Geneidy. “Integrating social equity into urban transportation planning: A critical evaluation of equity objectives and measures in transportation plans in North America.” Transport Policy 37 (2015): 167-176.

This article addresses the impact of urban transportation plans on sustainability by focussing on the strategies that can be adapted to promote equity, environmental conservation, and economic development. The article states that balancing the three concepts has been a challenge for urban planners over the years (168). According to Manaugh, Madhav, and Ahmed, proper transportation planning leads to tangible outcomes such as reduced greenhouse gas emissionand reduced traffic congestion. Besides, it leads to social and economic equity due to the development of the areas with closer proximity to transit systems (168). The authors argue that planners should diversify their goals and integrate a proper value system in making transportation decisions to promote social equity. Besides, they urge policymakers to develop policies that consider the disadvantaged individuals in the community during the planning and development of transport infrastructure in urban areas (174). This ar

Pay to View the Entire Post

To view this post and other posts in this category please pay the amount below


Activate subscription for single

To view this post and other posts in this category please pay the amount below