Book review on “Youth and substance abuse” by Kathryn Daley.

Book review on “Youth and substance abuse” by Kathryn Daley.

Reviews must be headed by a full bibliographic citation that includes the author’s name, the book’s title, the place of publication, publisher, date of publication, and number of pages. • The review itself usually begins with an introduction that reveals the reviewer’s arguments. The first paragraph usually repeats the book’s author and title as it provides a springboard for the rest of the essay. Effective first paragraphs also offer a very brief overview of the book’s content, the book’s purpose or audience, and the reviewer’s general reaction and evaluation. • The next set of paragraphs offers a critical evaluation. These paragraphs, which constitute the heart of the essay, typically discuss some of the following issues: how well the book has achieved its goal, the possibilities the book suggest, what the author has omitted, what is most persuasive, and how it compares to other texts. As personal statements, critical appraisals reveal the critic. Readers must understand the reviewer’s own standards to evaluate their use and appropriateness. This requires reviewers to distinguish the book’s message from those of the reviewer. It also means that, since the entire review is the reviewer’s opinion, reviewers should avoid using the “first person” and long quotations. Typically, this section is done by having a paragraph devoted to each chapter; that is, you should summarize the content of each chapter, and do so in an evaluative manner. • Reviews conclude by directly commenting on the book, tying together the review’s key issues, noting the text’s overall effectiveness, and highlighting how the work makes a significant contribution to the study of adolescence. Reviews help readers form a clear idea of the book’s concerns and surrounding issues. Focusing on ideas raised by books helps to make reviews helpful, respectful, and well-reasoned evaluations. This focus helps reviewers avoid being unnecessarily negative and “judgmental” by ensuring that they focus on what the book offers rather than on what it should have been. Like effective books, reviews promote understanding and further discussion; they engage and foster the deliberation of ideas worth considering.