“Design of a program to assist residents, their family, and care staff deal with grief”

“Design of a program to assist residents, their family, and care staff deal with grief”

Marking Criteria 1: An account of how the literature search was carried out, including which repositories of information were search and a detailed account of how the library electronic data bases were searched · Here you will be describing and detailing how you went about researching and accessing the various sources of information for your literature review, and which sources you focused upon. · For example, what key words did you enter that related specifically to your project · Briefly explain the results of the process/search and what was most useful and why Marking Criteria 2: An account of what you take ‘critical analysis’ to mean · You should explain in your own words (with academic reference material to support your claims) the meaning of this concept and relate it to the practice processes undertaken in completing your literature review Marking Criteria 3: An account of how the critical analysis of the corpus of documents was done. · A ‘corpus’ relates to a large and structured set of texts. Here you will be providing a brief overview and explanation of how the critical analysis was conducted. What biases did you notice and look for? What approach did you adopt to undertake your analysis – thematic, inductive, content analysis, narrative, or discursive? How did you determine the reliability of your sources and source material? Marking Criteria 4: Identification of areas of agreement and controversy · In this section you should clearly outline the key areas where you have noticed areas of agreement and disagreement in the research. This will need to be supported carefully with close reference to the source material you accessed. · Here you will need to sharpen your writing skills considerably and focus on the skilful synthesis and analysis of the research material. You should endeavour to integrate the key points relating to concurrence and divergence and be careful to not simply regurgitate what others have written. · The skill required in this section is to keep your writing tight and relevant to the key areas of agreement and controversy you have uncovered in your review of the literature. Marking Criteria 5: An account of the themes emerging as a result of the critical analysis · In this section you will need to carefully summarise and synthesise the key themes that you have uncovered and discovered through your research and review process. · What key themes did you notice kept appearing in your reading and review of the relevant literature? Why do you think this was the case? What implications does it have for the area/topic in general and how can you apply it to your project’s focus? · For this section, you will probably need to limit yourself to a few key themes – these might be catchwords that keep appearing – and provide a decent overview and analysis of their significance for your research. Marking Criteria 6: An account of gaps in the literature · Here you should identify the themes and topics that you noticed were either missing or not given enough attention in the literature relating to your topic. You will need to carefully support your claims here and explain why these present as significant gaps; how they relate to your project and perhaps impact on it. · For example, you might have noticed that the bulk of the literature you examined overlooked a consideration of key cultural issues, of addressing the specific cultural groups that is central to your project’s focus. This might be significant as the assumptions and findings made in the bulk of the research do not take into account the specific needs of this particular group or sub-group. Marking Criteria 7: An account of researchers dominant in this area · In this section you should briefly outline the key researchers you discovered in undertaking your literature review. As with most areas of life you will discover there are certain individuals who are expert in their field, who have undertaken extensive research over many years, and whose names keep appearing. · For example, if you were researching introductory counselling themes and practices you would discover the name ‘Geldard’ constantly crops up, and if theme was group work – ‘Corey’ – would be a consistent name. · It is important to identify the key players in your field of enquiry and this phenomenon should also inform your overall critical analysis.