Migration and the theories that account for why people leave their homelands and move to another country

Migration and the theories that account for why people leave their homelands and move to another country

Students are required to write two short papers, the first on immigration issues and a second paper on a topic discussed in class materials. The first paper is based on providing a theoretical overview of migration theories as well as a brief summary of Latino immigration to the United States (by focusing on one or more of the following groups: Mexican, Puerto Rican, or Cuban) from both historical and policy perspectives (8-10 pages). The first paper is due on Wednesday, October 18. You can add information and discussion of related topics when writing your paper. For example, a hot topic right now has to do with the executive order known as DACA, to help the so called “Dreamers” who are undocumented residents who were brought into the country when they were very young and who basically grew up in the United States. A great article that explains how DACA works in the magazine VOX, September 5, 2017 (“9 Facts that explain DACA”). Here is a link to the article: https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/8/31/16226934/daca-trump-dreamers-immigration Below is the rubric to evaluate and grade the paper: I will assess how well the essay shows mastery or achievement of the learning outcomes based on how well sociological models are applied to the immigration patterns observed historically for Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, or Cubans. Specifically, a student must present and apply the following theoretical models: neoclassical or rational choice; world systems theory; and social networks theory. The following standards will be used to measure how well the student demonstrated mastery of the learning outcomes, with 1=failure; 2=basic; 3=excellent; 4=outstanding. Students assessed as having performed in categories 3-4 have achieved the learning objective. 4 3 2 1 Organizes and synthesizes relevant theories to reveal insightful patterns, differences, or similarities related to the immigration patterns of Latino groups. Reveals how context of reception facilitated or hindered assimilation of two or more Latino groups. Lists and Organizes relevant theories to reveal important patterns, differences, or similarities related to the immigration experiences of Latino groups. Reveals how context of reception facilitated or hindered assimilation of one Latino group. Lists and Organizes relevant theories, but the organization is not effective in revealing important patterns, differences, or similarities in the immigration experience of Latino groups. Does not mention how context of reception facilitated or hindered assimilation. Lists relevant theories, but it is not organized and/or is unrelated to migration experiences. Incorrectly applied to a Latino group. Does not mention how context of reception facilitated or hindered assimilation. BOOKS: Saenz & Morales, “Historical and Contemporary Latino Immigration” (chapter 3, Latinos in the United States)