Rofessional Development, Recruitment and Retention

Rofessional Development, Recruitment and Retention

Successful healthcare organizations emphasize attracting human resource assets (people) and aggressively seek to resolve and prevent high employee turnover. Understanding the key components surrounding the importance of measuring employee turnover, learning how it affects patient care, and realizing what is needed to retain quality employees is central to the resolution. Measuring employee turnover in a healthcare department is fundamental to the success of the organization and the quality of care it delivers. Some studies indicate the cost of employee turnover can average between 20%-near 100% of the employee’s annual salary. As most of us are well-aware from our experience in the field, when employees leave, their duties are shifted to the remaining personnel who feel obligated to shoulder the additional burden. Perhaps the most important impact of high employee turnover may be the effect on patient care. Generally, all patients prefer to be cared for by the same members of a healthcare team each time they require treatment. This involves building relationships between the patients and their respective healthcare organizations. These relationships are vitally important to both the success of the facility and perceived value of the healthcare professional especially in cases where the same treatment/care can be received elsewhere. Creating an organizational environment that is dedicated to the retention of talented personnel is the first step in reducing employee turnover. Determining why employees are leaving an organization is an important part of developing an effective strategy. One way this information can be obtained is by conducting detailed exit interviews. In my experience and observations, organizations should focus on the following issues in order to maintain a qualified workforce in the long term: 1) enhanced communications; 2) efficient decision making; 3) fair and equitable compensation and benefits; 4) career development paths; 5) employee recruitment/retention; 6) employee recognition/appreciation and 7) understanding the role of management. Consider the following questions when determining the relationship between the employee and employer. 1) Do you agree with the mission of this organization? 2) Does your manager inspire you? 3) Do you feel teamwork is encouraged and practiced among your co-workers? 4) Are your co-workers held accountable for the quality of work they perform? 5) Do you feel valued for the work that you do? 6) Is the amount of work and the pace of the work required seem reasonable? 7) Do you feel that information is shared on a timely basis and open-honest communication is encouraged? 8) Do you receive adequate training in order for you to perform your job well? 9) Do you have the necessary tools to perform your job efficiently? 10) Do you have adequate opportunities for true professional growth and development?