Should Children be mandated to get vaccinated?

Should Children be mandated to get vaccinated?

On the title page, include the title of your essay, your name, the class, your instructor’s name, and the date (on one separate page). Include appropriate headers, spacing, and font, according to APA guidelines. The paper should be at least 1,200 words in length. Include a clear thesis statement on a debatable topic, and support it with quotes, examples, and facts from at least three credible sources. Include a separate references page. Encyclopedia articles (such as those from Wikipedia or Ask.com) are not acceptable sources. Documentation for citations must be correct according to the APA guidelines. Make use of the APA Citation Helper for properly citing sources. Annotated Bibliography Bernstein, L. (2014). Arguing with anti-vaxers: Maybe not a good idea. Washington: WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post. Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.southuniversity.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/1634635164?accountid=87314 Lenny Bernstein, a writer for The Washington Post in Washington D.C., believes that arguing with an individual who does not believe in vaccines is not the best way to convince them otherwise. He uses research from “Dartmouth College which states that in some cases the argument itself may be counter-productive.” He outlines the results from the research that found, “correcting vaccine myths may not be an effective approach to promoting vaccination;” this paradox seems to be explained by “when you’re challenged, you often try to defend the underlying belief or attitude that’s come into question.” This article is very useful for the topic in trying to understand the basic psychology of the human mind and why some people just cannot seem to be convinced of the truth but it can also serve as a useful bit of information by the CDC and other health organizations trying to figure out how to persuade the public to get vaccinated in order for them to be resistant to preventable illnesses. Ingraham, C. (2015). The devastating impact of vaccine deniers, in one measles chart. Washington: WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post. Retrieved from https://searchproquestcom.southuniversity.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/1647877981?accountid=87314 Christopher Ingraham, a reporter for The Washington Post in Washington D.C., believes that the current infection rate of measles resurgence may be an indication of a disturbing trend. He uses a graph by the CDC of cases of measles in the United States to illustrate how seriously the trend of cases goes up much quickly than all the previous years in the 21st century. He starts the article by asking, “if you want to quantify the alarming impact of the anti-vaccine movement, the chart is a good place to start;” he outlines how in the past twenty-five years, 2014 was “the biggest annual number” of new measles cases where “anti-vaxxers are quite literally turning back the clock on decades of public health progress.” While this article is directed towards the public and illustrates how the actions of the population are turning against themselves, it is very useful for my topic because it shows on how modern medicine has led people to forget the terrible, life-threatening aspects of disease. Millman, J. (2015). Vaccine deniers stick together. and now they’re ruining things for everyone. Washington: WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post. Retrieved from https://searchproquestcom.southuniversity.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/1648057757?accountid=87314 Jason Millman, a reporter in Washington D.C, strongly feels that the anti-vaccination community is ruining the safety and health of the general public. He gathers facts from history and statistics to show how measles is and also suggests how the thoughts of the community is being fueled by popular figures such as Jenny McCarthy and Mayim Bialik instead of actual scientists. He points out that a small handful of original cases at Disneyland has now “become one of the worst outbreaks of the disease in California in the past 15 years;” moreover, “anti-vaxxers … are among the most liberal … Marin County, San Francisco County and Alameda County.” Finally, he ends saying “research has shown that confronting anti-vaxxers with science only makes them more likely to reject vaccinations.” This article is an op-ed that clearly demonstrates Mr. Millman’s frustration with the opposing community and can be an indication on how heated the debate between the effectiveness of vaccination can be. This source relates to my topic because it shows the argumentative effect of Hollywood stars on persuasion. “Think Twice Global Vaccine Institute: Avoid Immunization Reactions.” Avoid Immunization Reactions. Thinktwice Global Vaccine Institute, Retrieved from http://thinktwice.com/ Think Twice Global Vaccine Institute, a website dedicated to informing parents on how vaccines are harmful to their children, argues that “some doctors will say anything to get parents to vaccinate, even if it doesn’t make sense or is an outright lie.” The site then goes on to prove its point by providing a FAQ section that is dedicated to demonstrate how all the pro vaccination individuals go through absurd lengths simply to prove they are correct. The site proves its point by “encouraging an uncensored exchange of vaccination information” using “personal stories’ to demonstrate how doctors don’t take vaccination injury claims seriously. The reason this source relates to my topic is because this site is strongly focused on the negative side effects of vaccination and would be of interest to see why some individuals believe vaccinations are bad. Godlee, F., Smith, J., & Marcovitch, H. (2011). Wakefield’s article linking MMR vaccine and autism was fraudulent. BMJ : British Medical Journal (Online), 342doi:http://dx.doi.org.southuniversity.libproxy.edmc.edu/10.1136/bmj.c7452 In this article the authors examine the claims made by a team of researchers led by Andrew Wakefield, linking the MMR vaccine with autism and other developmental disorders. The authors uncovered that some of the research conducted by the team was fraudulent. The authors critique the fact that the study was serious, with no clear control or adherence to the scientific method. However, its findings it starting the vaccination scare. The authors cite the tenacity of journalist Brian Deer for his help in uncovering the falsification. This article is helpful in understand the roots of the anti-vaccination movement as it will give me reference to present my argument.