The History and Development of Photomontage

The History and Development of Photomontage

The development and widespread of modern technology have had a positive impact on almost every sector and industry. Most of the processes that were hard to manage using traditional means are currently carried out with increased ease and convenience through the application of modern technology. This paper seeks to explore how the impact of advanced technology on the world of design. It will particularly focus on the relationship between modern technology and photography, discussing how its application has improved the photographic processes as compared to the earlier days during the industrial revolution. Some of the general and notable changes in the world of photography include the change in the traditional black and white negative-positive photographic processes. In the modern days, the quality of the images captured on camera has improved greatly and the clarity of images has made it easier to identify and capture even smaller details that could not be managed using the old photographic processes(Meggs, Philip & Alston, 2011). However, other than basic capturing of photographic images, one of the most profound developments in the world of photography that have been enhanced by technology include the development of photo editing processes that have improved the quality of images to even a higher level. Through technology, photomontage has made it easier to carry out such activities as marketing and has even promoted other essential industries such as film making industries.

To start with, photomontage refers to the process by which composite photographs are made through cutting, connecting, rearranging and or overlapping different photographs thereby coming with a new image (Agarwala et al., 2004). It is also commonly referred to as photoshopping in the modern world. The history of photomontage dates back to the earliest days of coinage by the Dadaists where it occurred by mixing different signifying modes such as printed and handwritten fragments off texts such as journals and newspapers. Some of the oldest recorded photomontages include ‘The Two Ways of Life’ which was a Victorian photomontage by Oscar Rejlander in 1857 which included a combination of printing(Meggs, Philip & Alston, 2011). The images of a photographer by the name Henry Peach Robinson followed shortly in 1858. Such were the images that set the challenge before most other photographers had learned the skill of combining different images to come up with a new composite image. Photomontage differs from collage in that as opposed to montage, collage comprises fragments of images that form sharp cut edges, while the component images in a montage are blended whereby the opacity

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