The limits of power

The limits of power

This is a book review on The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism. Here is the instructions by my teacher: II. Intro:  Introduce the author  Introduce the book (Title, What is it about?).  State author’s thesis and summarize content/arguments. III. Body:  Each paragraph should address different parts of the book or different arguments presented in the book.  This may also be in the form of arguments made about different time periods or stages within a time period.  Use key parts of the book (quotations/paraphrasing) to demonstrate how the author supports his or her thesis.  You may add your assessment (analysis/view on the author’s arguments) within each paragraph or in separate paragraphs  Make sure to evaluate the author’s arguments in terms of whether or not they are convincing, well researched, and logical. If the author’s work could contribute to the public’s understanding of the topic you may comment on that as well.  If you choose to disagree with the author you should do so strictly on academic grounds–i.e. use a reason-based argument to counter her or his argument. IV. Conclusion  Evaluation of the author’s success or failure to substantiate his or her thesis with evidence and argumentation  Evaluation of book’s contribution to history, the public’s knowledge of the subject, “readability” and style. Format: *Review should be 5 pages double-spaced; stapled at the top left hand corner at a 45-degree angle *Font 12, Times New Roman *One-inch margins on both sides *You may use Chicago, APA, or MLA style for footnotes or endnotes (Ask in the library if you don’t know what to do) *Do not enclose your paper in any type of folder *Make sure to save copies of your paper in multiple locations Biographical Sketch: Andrew J. Bacevich, Sr. (born 1947 in Normal, Illinois) is a professor of international relations at Boston University and a retired career officer in the United States Army. He is a former director of Boston University’s Center for International Relations (from 1998 to 2005), and author of several books, including American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of US Diplomacy (2002), The New American Militarism: How Americans are Seduced by War (2005) and The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism (2008). He has been “a persistent, vocal critic of the US occupation of Iraq, calling the conflict a catastrophic failure.”[1] In March 2007, he described George W. Bush’s endorsement of such “preventive wars” as “immoral, illicit, and imprudent.”[1][2] His son, also an Army officer, died fighting in the Iraq War in May 2007.[1]