The United States v. Lori Drew

The United States v. Lori Drew

The consequences of cyberbullying among students and even adults resulted in many States developing laws that would help curb the menace and further protect the would be victims from physical or psychological distress and even suicide due to cyber-bullying (Ruedy, 2007). Lori Drew, a mother from Missouri, came to the spotlight of the American community and its justice system as a whole when she contributed to the suicide of her daughter’s former friend Mega Meier. Drew opened a MySpace account as Josh Evans, a teenager and started the correspondence with Meier. The relationship went on to a serious point, but Josh cut it off and told Meier that the world would be a better place without people like her. Meier had developed a significant attachment towards Josh even if their relationship was established and advanced through the internet. Ultimately, Meier sent Josh an email stating that he was the kind of boy a girl would end her life for. True to her word, Meier ended her life fifteen minutes after she sent the email to Josh. Drew was arrested and charged for abuse of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act because the state had not developed any laws to curb cyberbullying. Her charge was that she misrepresented her identity when creating the MySpace account without authorization with the aim of obtaining information from MySpace information, which resulted in the charge of computer fraud.

She had violated the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act as she had engaged in the illegal acquisi

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